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Doctrine of Christian Discovery timeline

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published by drowaan

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Timeline of Doctrine of Christian Discovery:

Diving below the Iceberg

1452

Dum Diversas (1st Doctrine of Discovery Papal Bull)

1455

Rominus Pontifex (2nd Doctrine of Discovery Papal Bull)

1493

Intercaetera (3rd Papal Bull)

1492

Columbus lands at Hispaniola in search of “India”

1496

King Henry the 7th of England issues patent to John Cabot to appropriate lands "which before this time were unknown to all Christians"

*timeline not to scale*

1580s

Elizabeth I of England and her legal advisers use DoCD principles and occupation of “non-Christian lands” to claim legal title to English conquests

1613

Two Row Wampum Treaty between the Haudenosaunee and the Dutch at (present day) Albany New York

1670

Royal Charter creates “Rupert’s Land” in what is now the Canadian North-West

1763

Royal Proclamation of 1763

1764

Wampum Treaty at Niagara

1776

Declaration of Independence

1778

Treaty of 1778 ARTICLE 1. That all offences or acts of hostilities by one, or either of the contracting parties against the other, be mutually forgiven, and buried in the depth of oblivion, never more to be had in remembrance.

1787

Northwest Ordinance Act 1787 - Put the world on notice not only that the land north of the Ohio River and east of the Mississippi would be settled, but that it would eventually become part of the United States.

1812-1830s

Changes in military, demographic, economic, and intellectual contexts redefine the relationship from one of inter-reliance to one of Euro-North American dominance

1823

Johnson v M’Intosh (First of the Marshall Trilogy, establishing the Doctrine of Christian Discovery in US Law.) This was followed by Cherokee Nation v Georgia in 1831 and Worcester v Georgia in 1832.

1824

Office of Indian Affairs established

Mohawk Institute opens in Brantford (Ontario).  First contemporary residential school run by the Anglican Church.

1828

1830

Indian Removal Act

The Department of Indian Affairs moved from Military to Civilian Control, signaling a shift in the nation-to-nation relationship set out in treaties.

1857

Gradual Civilization Act

1857

The CRC is Born

1864

Navajo Long Walk – forced relocation from present day Arizona to Bosque Redondo NM.

1867

Confederation.  A “Dominion from Sea to Sea”

1871-1921

Negotiation and signing of the numbered treaties

1876

The Indian Act

1883

Government of Canada formalizes the Residential Schools System

1888

St. Catharine’s Milling Co v Regina

1889

CRC starts the Board of Heathen Mission. Tamme Vanden Bosch sent to Minister among the Sioux at Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota

1890

Vanden Bosch resigns due to frustration

Massacre at Wounded Knee, South Dakota

1896

The CRC begins its mission in Navajo and Zuni territories

1903

1905

Rehoboth Christian School established

First CRC in Canada opens in Alberta

1934

Indian Reorganization Act

1955

DoCD cited in Tee-Hit-Ton v. United States

1973-4

Indian Family Centre established in Winnipeg Manitoba

1973

Calder Decision (Land Claims)

1996

Last government-run residential school closes

2003

Rehoboth Christian School issues "A Message of Confession and Reconciliation" http://www.rcsnm.org/confession.pdf

2005

Justice Ginsberg cites the DoCD in City of Sherrill v. Oneida Indian Nation of New York

1987

CRC in Canada joins in Ecumenical affirmation of a New Covenant with Aboriginal Peoples

2007

CRC in Canada re-asserts commitment to  New Covenant with Aboriginal Peoples

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples approved by the General Assembly

2008

Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement and Prime Minister’s Apology to Survivors

2015

Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC)report recommends repudiation of DoCD

CRC in Canada commits to Action for Reconciliation at final TRC event

13th c.

13th Century Crusades. Muslim Moors called less human than the soldiers of Christendom.

2009

US Congress buries Apology (and disclaimer) to Native peoples of the United States in 2010 Dept of Defense Appropriations Act