Why and How?

Setting the Rules

Letting the students set the rules

The Why

Own

Respect

Set

Accountable

Solve

Create

Transfers

Citizen

Inclusions

Attention

Teambuilding

Voice

Let the students take ownership of the rules.

It shows the students you respect their opinion.

It sets a good tone for the whole term, semester, or year.

It creates an atmosphere for student-to-student accountability.

It helps solve problems before they happen. For example, as the rules are being discussed rules for the rules will surface.

It lets the students create rules that you may overlook.

It transfers the "fault" of breaking the rules to the students. Teacher can say, "I didn't make the rules, you did."

It gets the students thinking about what good citizenship is all about.

It fosters a classroom of inclusion. During the rule making process everyone gets to share and discuss. No rule is a dumb rule.

It is an instant attention grabber.

It begins to help teams and students bond in the classroom.

It gives students a voice.

The How

Explain

Sticky It

Read

Add

Share

Discuss

Ask

Scribe

Break

Argue

Vote

Debate

Add

Secret ballot

Ask students to add a rule to a sticky note. Place the sticky notes on the board or wall.

Read out loud each rule. Ask students to group rules.

Explain that the students will be setting the rules.

Break into small groups and discuss what they think of the rules- which rules they should combine or remove or add...

Ask a group lead to share the group's findings.

Add missing rules.

Ask for a person to volunteer as the scribe to write out the rules.

Ask if any rules surfaced during the class discussion that need to be added. For example, Did someone dominate the discussion? Do you need a rule for that?

Have an all class discussion. Pass a beach ball so each student gets a voice.

Have students vote on the rules. Rules that everyone agrees on should be added to the rules list.

Ask students to make arguments on the remaining rules. Have students take the for and against roles.

Break back into groups of for and against. Let groups come up with debate arguments.

Take a final vote and ask each student to agree to the final rules list.

Ask if any additional rules came out of the debate. Add to the list.

Debate the rules.

Discuss